Amazon will create 1,500 jobs in southern Arizona with the opening of a new warehouse

This warehouse will handle customer returns, assembly, 3-D printing and direct product collection by customers in the automatic kiosks of the southeast of the city.

The company announced the opening of a giant warehouse in Tucson and the creation of 1,500 jobs that together with the more than 2,000 jobs that Raytheon Missile Systems opened, which will expand its plant near the airport, strengthens the growth and progress of the South of Arizona.

Amazon chose to open this warehouse that will handle customer returns, assembly, 3-D printing and direct product collection by customers in the automatic kiosks in the southeast of the city.

For most of the year, the project will have a maximum of 1,500 employees working on the site at the same time. During the peak shopping season, that is, from November to December, the company will have a maximum of 1,900 employees.

The 855,000 square foot facility will be located on several Tucson plots southeast of the city.

“The first act of Amazon was to request that it be included in the city,” said Jonathan Rothschild, mayor of Tucson. “I am pleased to see Amazon want to become the newest business in the city.”

The industrial building will be the second largest in the Tucson area. Currently, the largest is the Target dispatch center also on the southeast side of the city which has 975,000 square feet.

“We are excited to open a new cutting edge center in Tucson and will continue to innovate in a state committed to providing great employment opportunities and customer experience,” said Mark Stewart, Amazon’s vice president of operations in North America.

Amazon has four existing centers in Arizona with more than 7,000 employees.

The new Amazon winery will receive, store and ship products, which include automobiles, appliances, electronic products and software, groceries and alcohol, office supplies, toys and video games.

The warehouse will be a single-story structure, approximately 60 feet high, with 64 loading docks, 398 tractor parking spaces and approximately 2,500 vehicle parking spaces.

“Amazon’s selection of Tucson for this new and impressive facility demonstrates that Southern Arizona has a lot to offer companies in terms of talent, location, business-friendly environment and quality of life,” said Doug Ducey, governor of Arizona. “This project will create thousands of new jobs and generate significant capital investment in the region, and we thank Amazon for its continued growth and investment in our state.”

The announcement from Amazon consolidated Tucson as an important logistics center, authorities said, noting that the company did not ask for incentives and signed the agreement based on demography and geography.

The Raytheon Missile Systems company, based in Tucson, recently opened 2,000 new jobs for the expansion of its plant near the airport. The majority of workers have already been hired.

Raytheon, Arizona’s largest private employer, has about 11,800 employees at the main facility near the airport and other facilities in the Tucson area.

Among the company’s plans is the construction of 2020 buildings for classified research and development programs, including laboratories, a high-performance computing center and a massive internal anti-echo chamber to test missile sensors, according to executives. of the company.

Raytheon, which has benefited from significant increases in national defense spending, announced in November 2016 that it would add 2,000 employees, with average annual salaries of more than $ 100,000 and spend some $ 400 million on new buildings and improvements to expand its complex in the Tucson International Airport.

Ducey and Rothschild, described as a ‘victory’ for Arizona the strengthening of these companies and the establishment of other companies.

“The fact that a global industry leader like Raytheon chose Tucson for expansion is a testament to the city’s growing reputation as a hotbed of innovative companies and technologies,” said Ducey.

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